Flowcharting Help Page (Tutorial)
Additional clarification on flow chart connectors
by Dexter A. Hansen

Additional clarification on flow chart connectors

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There are a number of professions that use flowcharting.  The list below includes various books on flowcharting as well as several on VISIO, one of the most used programs for flowcharting.


Flowcharting Help Page List of Recommended Flowcharting Books


The Basics of Process Mapping 2nd Edition by Robert Damelio (Author) Kindle  Hardcover   Paperback

Go With the Flow!: The Clutter Flow Chart Workbook  January 20, 2023
by Hazel Thornton
Paperback

Flowcharts Usage: Get An Introduction To The Use Of Flowcharts As A Process Design December 23, 2022
by Irving Brangan) 
Paperback

MICROSOFT VISIO USER GUIDE: THE COMPLETE GUIDE FOR BEGINNERS AND EXPERTS TO MASTER VISIO DIAGRAMS by TIM VEGA | Dec 14, 2023
Paperback

Visualize Complex Processes with Microsoft Visio: A guide to visually creating, communicating, and collaborating business processes efficiently
by David J Parker and Senaj Lelic | May 12, 2023 Kindle Paperback

Free Diagram & Flowchart Software for Mac for Chart Drawing and Creation,
Mac Download  PC Download
Connector



off page
                    connector

Connector - This symbol shows continuation of the flow chart from one page to another or from a decision diamond to another page or process. When you reach the bottom of the page or need to jump to another page, draw a flow chart connector symbol and connect it to the last item on the chart. Label the inside of the symbol with a letter, typically beginning with an "A" and page number where the process continues. I.E. The label Conn2points to point A on Page 2. When the process continues to another page, draw another flow chart connector symbol at an appropriate location. Label the symbol with the same letter and the page number where it continues. On page 2 in this example, the label conn1would be to indicate the process was continued at point A on page 1.

An alternate symbol also used is in more complex flowcharts is the Off Page Connector where the numbering convention is like that of the connector described above, however, the Connectors are assigned node numbers (i.e. node A1 is where one segment of a flow stops and another node A1 would be where another flow shown at a different location on the flowchart starts).  The Off Page Connector is then used to show that the flow is on a different page.The letter A refers to a connection to another part of the flow chart, typically on another page. From the first page, the connector would be labeled A-2. That means go to page 2 and find connector A-1 (the connector from the first page). Any letters can be used to describe the connectors and on as many pages needed to document the flowchart. The letter is used to denote nodes or connections to other parts of the flowchart. This is done because with some flowcharts, there is just to much detail to put it all on one page.

If the nodes are put on only one page and an "A" is used to denote a break, the flowchart reader would look for the node "A" elsewhere on the page as a connection to a separate flowchart (a leg). (An A hooks up with A). If there were a "B" node, that would mean there is another leg to the flow chart and to find the flow, you would need to find the second "B" to trace out the flow for the second leg.

There is nothing exclusive about using A, B, C, X, Y, or Z. They are just indicators that a part of the flowchart is located elsewhere.

Numbers are added after a dash behind the letter to indicate which page to look on to find the node. Detailed flowcharts can have several pages.




Flowchart
                    same page connector


Flow chart
                    off page connector

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Copyright
Dexter A. Hansen